Karen Dumas Genealogy Churches in Quebec

Ste. Anne-de-Beaupré

The Basilica of Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré is a basilica set along the Saint Lawrence River in Quebec, 30 kilometres (19 miles) east of Quebec City. It has been credited by the Catholic Church with many miracles of curing the sick and disabled. It is an important Catholic sanctuary which receives about a half-million pilgrims each year.

The basilica is known for performing many miracles, and people from all around the world come to visit the basilica. One of the builders had crutches but when he finished building the church, he was able to walk freely. The front entrance wall is said to be covered in crutches.
The basilica in Sainte-Anne-de-Beaupré was initially a shrine to honour Saint Anne. It was built for two reasons: to provide a place of worship for the new settlers in the area and to house a marvellous statue of St. Anne. The first reported miracle at the site happened during the shrine’s construction. A man named Louis Guimond was hired to help build the shrine even though he suffered from rheumatism. After placing three stones upon the shrine’s foundation, Guimond was cured of all his ailments. This was followed by other testimonies of healed people and the shrine soon grew in popularity. Many pilgrims came to the shrine hoping to receive a miracle while others like Anne of Austria supported the shrine from their homes.

Because of the popularity of the shrine, the Catholic Church had to enlarge the building several times to accommodate all the pilgrims. In 1876, the first basilica opened for worship. The dimensions of the basilica, including the side chapels, were 158 × 77 m (200ʹ × 100ʹ). The first basilica was destroyed in a fire on March 29, 1922. The present-day basilica was built on the site of the prior church in 1926.
Miracles are still believed to be performed at the basilica. When entering the church one can see two pillars filled with racks of crutches, canes, braces, and other signs of disabilities. Every item has been left by a pilgrim who reports being healed at the basilica.

The wooded hillside next to it has a memorial chapel and a Way of the Cross, or Stations of the Cross.

Ste. Anne de Beaupre

Ste. Anne-de-la-Perade

Ste. Anne de la Perade

Ste. Cecile Bic

Ste. Cecile Bic

Ste. Croix

Ste. Croix

Ste. Emilie Energie

Ste. Emilie Energie

Ste. Famille Ile d’Orleans

This church was the first founded on the I’le d’Orleans, with construction beginning shortly before 1669. The church is 80 feet long and 36 feet wide. By 1683, there were 51 families and 394 individuals attending. Building of the church began again in 1743 and ended in 1749. At this point, the length of the church was 96 feet long. It underwent numerous repairs over the years. The church was consecrated by Monseigneur de Pontbriand in September 1749 and is one of the few churches that have been consecrated and is one of eight in the archdiocese of Quebec. The rich soil surrounding this church made it almost exclusively a farming community.

In 1685, the Abbe Lamy begged Sister Marguerite Bourgeoys to send two Sisters of her society to found a convent in his parish. Sisters Anne Hioux and Marie Barbier arrived in November 1785, opening the convent shortly afterwards and little girls of the parish and others on the island received instruction for almost two and one half centuries.

Seigniorial pews were among the privileges under the French Regime. The seigneur had the right to a permanent seat in the best part of the church, the right-hand side just four feet from the altar rail. He marched immediately after the priest in processionals and received the first of the blessed bread with his wife and children following. Other privileges included the Cure commending the seigneur and his wife and children in his sermons.

Ste. Famille Ile d'Orleans

Ste. Gertrude Beancour

Ste. Gertrude Beancour

Ste. Julie Laurierville

Ste. Julie Laurierville

Ste. Marguerite-de-Blairfindie

In the 18th century, L’Acadie was an important village that developed mainly around the Sainte-Marguerite-de-Blairfindie Church. Many of our relatives who lived in New York traveled here to have their children baptized and marriages blessed.

Colonists had been living in the area since 1753 and the Acadians arrived 10 years later after being deported by the English. The religious complex building began in 1784. Construction of the church in L’Acadie began on September 2, 1800 with mass being celebrated on December 23, 1801. During the Rebellion of 1837, legend tells us that the English troops entered the Church with their horses after the torching of the patriots’ homes. Throughout the years, this area would bear many names ... among them Petite Cadie, Blairfindie and finally L’Acadie.

Ste. Marguerite de Blairfindie

Ste. Victoire-de-Sorel

Ste. Victoire Sorel

 

Karen Dumas Genealogy Churches in Quebec
Karen Dumas Genealogy
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