Karen Dumas Genealogy Churches in Quebec

St. Jean Baptist l’Isle Verte

Samuel de Champlain made mention of the L’Islet, calling it the “green island” and in 1664 the Relations of the Jesuits mentioned it as the Isle Verte. Further back, Jacques Cartier mentioned this area in 1535. The first mission was established around 1766. St. Jean Baptiste Church was founded in 1828 and built between 1846 and 1855. It is located at 150 St-Jean-Baptiste street in the city of l’Isle Verte.

St. Jean Baptiste l'Isle Verte

St. Jean Chrysostome

St. Jean Chrysostome

St. Jean l’Évangeliste

Gabriel Marchand, a local notable, instigated the building of the first church and it was completed in November 1828. It likely contained two church towers as the building contract stated that it had to resemble the one in Saint-Luc. The presbytery was built in 1830.

From 1830 to 1860, Saint-Jean’s population exploded from 800 to 3,317 people and Victor Bourgeau, the most influential architect in Montreal, expanded the church. The extension of the church began in 1861 and was completed in 1866.

Another renovation became necessary in 1923 and the church tower now holds five bells.

St. Jean l'Evangeliste

St. Jean Ile d’Orleans

This parish was established in 1678 and was originally called Saint Francois de Sales. There were 33 families and 165 individuals. The wooden chapel was 30 feet long and 20 feet wide. The second church was built in 1707 that was also wooden. By 1730 it was in a state of immense decay so that by 1733 construction with stone began with the church still being worked on in 1739. Work continued over the centuries.

The old parish school, one of the oldest rural schools in Quebec is still standing. The original stone church, built in 1734, was unfortunately destroyed by a fire in 1988 following a car accident, taking with it the memory of its charming exterior architecture and the numerous interior historic religious furnishings and works of art. The parishioners were solely dedicated to farming.

The English used this church for a hospital for their sick and wounded in 1759 during the Siege of Quebec.

St. Jean Ile d'Orleans

St. Jean Port Joli

St. Jean Port Joli Church was built in 1779. Inside today is the seigneurial bench, occupied by the lords of Saint Jean Port Joli. Under the bench rests the last Lord Philippe Aubet of Gaspe.

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St. Jean Port Joli
St. Joachim Chateauguay St. Joachim Chateauguay

St. Joseph-de-Lauzon

St. Joseph’s was erected in 1675 and dedicated to St. Joseph. It was destroyed by fire in 1830 and reconstructed between 1830 and 1832. It’s convent was built in 1855 and Saint Joseph-de-Lauzon school was built in 1885. The 1,500 people originally buried in the old cemetery were transferred in 1875 to Mont Marie Historical Cemetery. Trees on the grounds are over 100 years old.

For more info, click on the links below:
patrimoine-religieux.com
grandquebec.com
chaudiere.com

St. Joseph du Lauzon

St. Joseph-du-Chambly

People have lived in Chambly since the 17th century which sits on the Richelieu River. The famous Father Mignault was from this parish who traveled many dangerous miles to minister to the parishioners in Chambly and New York. Our relatives were host to this dedicated man of God and parishioners in the earlier years of our history. It is located at 164 Rue Martel, Chambly.

Chambly is also the site of Fort Chambly which as built to protect the French from the English. But in 1760, the British took over the fort.

St. Joseph du Chambly

St. Laurent Ile d’Orleans

The parish was originally established under the name of Saint Paul until 1698. The church was dedicated to Saint Paul in 1675 at the place known as the l’Arbre Sec (The Dry Tree). Monseigneur de Laval said in 1683, “It is made of lath and plaster and extremely bad-roofed.” In 1687, the priest of Saint Jean, Saint Paul and Saint Pierre officiated here.

Near the church in 1759, the English under the command of Wolfe disembarked, finding the church nearly empty because the people had withdrawn to Charlesbourg. The people had taken away the ornaments of the altar. The cure of Saint Laurent M. Martel had left a letter addressed to "the worthy officers of the British Army” imploring them in the name of humanity to respect the house of God, the cure’s house and all attached to it for the love of God and out of compassion for the unfortunate parishioners driven from their homes. “I would have hoped”, he added, “that you might have arrived earlier so you could have tasted the vegetables such as asparagus, radishes that grow in my garden and which have now gone to seed.” Wolfe complied with the cure’s request leaving Saint Laurent untouched. Wolfe attached his proclamation in French promising protection to Canadians if they pledge themselves to take no part either directly or indirectly in a dispute, which he said, concerned only the Crowns of France and England. It read, “The King of England does not mean to wage war upon the agricultural laboureur, the established church and defenceless women and children. His royal clemency offers them relief in their distress. The people can live on their properties in their houses and exercise their religious duties in all safety without fear of molestation. But if you yield to the proud obstinacy and ill advised bravery, the people take up arms against the British Crown, they will suffer the most terrible consequence: the complete ruin of their crops the destruction of their dwellings, the sacking of their holy places by furious soldiery and the blockade of the river Saint Lawrence by a formidable fleet, thus rendering impossible any hope of deliverance.”
The church as it now stands began in 1860.

A story that brings smiles to one’s face concerned the cure Father Naud. One of the longer reigning priests, Father Naud never liked baptisms and held a lot of sway in the naming of the child. He became quite irritated to the last degree if the Christian names were not drawn from the Saint’s Calendar. If the name chosen was not to his liking, he would select a name more to his taste and fill in the certificate. By that time, it was too late to rechristen under the original name the parents had chosen. Many a godmother and godfather tried to argue with the Cure without success. One such godfather wanted to name the child Saint Jean Baptiste with Father Naud saying, “Just Jean Baptiste will do for today, you have no idea how the child will turn out; wait a little later before you canonize him and if he is a new Saint Jean Baptiste it will be the Church’s business to raise him on a pedestal.” These discussions would last an hour verses the 15 minutes for the usual baptism.

St. Laurent also became intricately involved with the sea, establishing a boat-building yard. They came to specialize in the Saint Lawrence coaster and schooner.

St. Laurent Ile d'Orleans

St. Luc

Beginning in 1665, the Carignan Salieres Regiment built a fortress before they started work on Fort Saint Luc. Settlers came to live close to the fort. Their only road to the settlements of La Prairie and Saint Jean crossed the bog and wetlands. They attended church at LaPrairie and Sainte Marguerite-de-Blairfindie. Settlers persistently requested their own parish and thus Saint Luc was established around the Coteau-des-Hetres. Again we see the town of St. Luc being developed around the presbytery, which included a cemetery during the 19th century.

St. Luc

St. Mathias sur Richelieu

The first vault was constructed in wood and blessed in 1739 on ground given for this purpose by Lord Hertel de Rouville. By 1771, it decayed and replaced by a stone vault. Between 1784 and 1788, the first parish church was built and was remodeled in 1805, 1818 and 1821.

St. Mathias Richelieu

St. Medard Warwick

Abbott Clovis Gagnon was the missionary who first celebrated mass in 1841 in the territory of the future parish of Warwick in a local home. The first vault was made of wood in 1848. Monseigneur Thomas Cooke decreed the erection of the parish of Saint Warwick in 1860. A decree was issued in 1863 to allow the construction of a church. However, a cyclone destroyed 34 houses in the village in 1864 and the parishioners chose construction of a temporary vault. The parish church was set up in 1874 in the town of Warwick, located in the area of the Center of Quebec. The church was dedicated to a saint born in 456 that died in 545 at Noyon. Joseph Ferdinand Peachy was the English architect who converted to Catholicism and then refused to speak English for the rest of his life
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St. Medard Warwick

St. Michel-de-Bellechasse

Saint Michel-de-Bellechasse was founded in 1678 after the Seigneur de la Durantaye. It is also located on the shores of the St. Lawrence River.
Its history begins in 1672, with the concession of the seignory to Olivier Morel, a noble from Brittany, France.

In 1678, the siegniory of La Durantaye formed a large parish between Beaumont and the Rivere de Wolf, set up by Bishop Laval. By 1693, the population increased so that it became an autonomous parish. As no church was built, the registers were deposited at Saint Etienne Beaumont. During the next five years, the parish took the name of Saint Michelle Durantaye (1698). The English invaded St Michel in 1759.

No image available

St. Remi Napierville

St. Remi Napierville

St. Roch Aulnaies

The seigniory of Saint Roch was conceded to Nicolas Juchereau of Saint Denis in 1656. In June 1717, the Seigneuress of St Denis made a gift of land for the construction of the vault. In the meantime religious services were provided by the missionaries. During the siege of Quebec in 1759, it was set on fire and partially destroyed. A request for a church was made in 1773 to Mgr. Jean Olivier Briand and permission was granted in 1773 with the church finished in 1777. A new church was built in 1849 and completed in 1853.

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St. Roch Aulnaies

St. Roch-de-Quebec

The inhabitants of Saint Roch obtained authorization to build a third church in 1811. This church was devastated by fire in 1816 and rebuilt at once using the same plans. It was increased in size in 1841 but a mere four years later, it was destroyed by fire again, being rebuilt on the same walls between 1845 – 1847. The parish continued to grow and in 1913, it was decided to build a larger more imposing church on the site of the previous three churches.

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St. Roch de Quebec

St. Romuald Farnham

St. Romuald Farnham

St. Rose-de-Lima

This church was built between 1852 and 1856 by the architect Bourgeau.

St. Rose de Lima

St. Sauveur de Quebec

The construction of this church began in 1850 to allow residents of the area to attend mass in their own neighborhood. In 1853 it was still under construction. A fire broke out in 1866 and ravaged the entire neighborhood. It was rebuilt in two years and still stands today.

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St. Sauveur de Quebec

St. Valentin

St.Valentin was established in 1832 after having been a mission served by the priest from St. Luc and St. Cyprien. Marriage Records begin in 1830. It was destroyed by fire in 1971 and the new church was first used in December of 1972. Pictures are from Father Paul Emile Dumas shared with Betty Lou Madden.

St. Valentin

 

Karen Dumas Genealogy Churches in Quebec
Karen Dumas Genealogy
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