Karen Dumas Genealogy Churches in Quebec

St. Antoine-de-Tilly

St. Antoine-de-Tilly is located 25 kilometers from Quebec City. The first settlers arrived in 1680, beginning with three seigneurial manors. The Tilly Manor was built in 1786 for Militia Captain Jean-Baptiste Noel de Tilly. Dionne Manor was built in 1850 and Normand’s General Store in 1894. The Church was built in 1788 and Andre Paquet created the interior in 1837. It was enlarged in 1902. The original structure was wooden and only had one bell tower.

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St. Athanase-de-Bleury

In 1764, Clément de Sabrevois, Sieur de Bleury, sold his lands to the Sieurs Gabriel Christie and Moses Hazen. Moses Hazen played an important role in the Revolutionary War as he was commander of the French troops with whom our relative Antoine Paulin served.

The area had various names, such as Bleury and Mille-Roches, the most commonly used. Mille-Roches, literally “a thousand rocks”, referred to the riverbed when the water was low. In 1847, the village of Christivielle was officially formed near Trinity Church. Iberville’s only Anglican church, Trinity Church was founded in 1841 by the son of Gabriel Christie. A few years later in 1859, the name Christieville would vanish to be replaced by “Iberville,” in memory of the famous Pierre Le Moyne d’Iberville.

By 1823, a new Catholic parish began under the patronage of Saint-Athanase. The parish municipality was incorporated in 1845 under the name of Saint-Athanase-de-Bleury and spread over a vast territory of rich farmlands, with the village of Christieville nestled in the center.

St. Athanese

St. Barnabe Sud

St. Barnabe Sud

St. Casimir

St. Casimir Territory was formed by the seigniory of St Charles de Grondines and is one of the oldest in Quebec. Colonists began settling in 1721 and by 1760 there were about 30 dwellings along the banks of the river. They first attended Ste. Anne-de-la-Perade and in 1835, the residents requested that the archbishop of Quebec erect a new parish. In February 1836, a decree was issued to erect a parish and October 9, 1847, Thomas Larouche became their first pastor. Only 14 baptisms, 5 burials, and a marriage were recorded in 1847.

St. Casimir

St. Charles Limoilou

In 1896, a group of parishioners of Saint Roch asked the bishop to create a new church, complaining about the distance that separated them from their parish church. Saint Charles Mission was thus created, consisting of a room arranged with a stage with old brown rope manufactured by the Village of Limoilou to define the area of worship. The sisters of the Hopital de Quebec gave five arpents of land for the new church. The new church opened its doors November 14, 1897. Tragedy struck in 1899 with fire destroying the church. David Ouellet called for offers to rebuild the church in 1900 and it reopened in December 1901 for worship. Fire destroyed the church again in 1916 and a third church was rebuilt on same site in 1918.

St. Charles Limoilou
St. Come Joliette St. Come Joliette

St. Constant

In 1744, the parishes of Saint Constant and Saint Philippe were created deep in the seigneury of Laprairie. Bishop Pontbriand directed the parishioners to obtain the approval of his vicar general for two churches, which were built in 1749 and 1751. Finally, during the pastoral visit of 1749, the bishop ordered four churches to be rebuilt in stone, all of them situated on the domain of the seminary of Saint-Sulpice: Saint-Joachim-de-la-Pointe-Claire, La Visitation du Sault-au-Récollet, Saint-Pierre-du-Portage-de-L’Assomption, and Sainte-Geneviève-de-Pierrefonds. These many and varied works, were carried out under the ultimate direction of Louis Normant Du Faradon, suffice to justify his title of church-builder.

St. Constant

St. Cyprien-de-Napierville

St. Cyprien-de-Napierville parish began in 1823. Jean Baptiste Paquin was the first parish priest. Renovations occurred in 1847 and 1857 but was destroyed by fire in 1886 along with the convent and two other houses in the village. Rebuilding took place between 1887 and1889 along with the convent of the sisters of Holy Anne which was later sold in 1989 and became a residence for the elderly.

St. Cyprien

St. Denis sur Richelieu

Currently it is the third church built on the site. A wooden structure was built in 1740 and replaced by a stone church in 1764 with a third church constructed in 1793. The priest drew up the plans for the last church in the shape of a Latin Cross. Renovations were done through out the 1800’s.

St. Denis sur Richelieu

St. Edouard de Gentilly

The Cent Associes Company conceded the Gentilly seigneury to Nicolas Marsolet and Pierre Lefebvre. Bishop Laval established Gentilly, which is part of the Champlain parish, as a provincial township in either 1670 or 1671. Residents were required to cross the St Laurent River in order to attend religious services or the parish priest of Champlain would come and celebrate mass in a private home. Beginning in 1756, the residents began requesting their own church but disagreements arose concerning the location of where the church would be built. Agreement was reached in 1772 and in 1773 the chosen name of St Olivier was not acceptable because there was already another parish using that parsonage. They chose St Edouard after the King of England. Father Jean Louis Demers supervised the construction in 1781. The stone church was opened for services in 1784.

Spring floods plagued the church and although an alternative 8 acre parcel of land was chosen construction was again delayed because of lack of consensus. Foundations were laid in 1845 and the last mass in the old church was said on December 16,1849 and the first mass in the new church was celebrated on December 23. The new church cost 1,155 louis. By 1962 the church was considered as a ‘landmark’

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St. Edouard de Gentilly

St. Edouard Napierville

St. Edouard Napierville

St. Enfant Jesus Pointe Aux Trembles

Pointe Aux Trembles was founded in 1674. The parish is one of the oldest in Montreal. It became the fourth parish for Montreal in 1848 when the Bishop of Montreal decided to set up a church there. Mr. Pierre Beaubien made a gift of land to the Bishop for the church and a temporary vault was built. In June 1857 the angular stone church was blessed. In 1899 restoration and enlarging began.

St. Enfant Jesus Pointe Aux Trembles

St. Etienne de Beaumont

One can say that the Isle d’Orleans was the mother of Beaumont. Frequent contact with the islanders was caused by the fact that the Beaumontois had to go in their boats to hear Sunday mass. Later the residents used horses to go to the various churches in the surrounding countryside. In 1672, Jean Talon granted Charles Couillard the Seigniory of Beaumont but the population increased slowly and it was not until 1692 that the parish of St. Etienne de Beaumont was founded. The 1733 church is one of the oldest in Quebec. Its door was where the English posted their proclamation issuing the fall of Quebec. The villagers hastened to tear down the proclamation and the English tried to burn the church to punish the Canadians. With each attempt to apply a torch to the doors of the church, the flames mysteriously died out and the church was saved.

St. Etienne de Beaumont

St. Felix Chennville

St. Felix Chennville

St. Francois de Sales Montmagny

St. Francois de Sales Montmagny

St. Francois Ile d’Orleans

This parish was established in 1678 and was originally called Saint Francois de Sales. There were 33 families and 165 individuals. The wooden chapel was 30 feet long and 20 feet wide. The second church was built in 1707 that was also wooden. By 1730 it was in a state of immense decay so that by 1733 construction with stone began with the church still being worked on in 1739. Work continued over the centuries.

The old parish school, one of the oldest rural schools in Quebec is still standing. The original stone church, built in 1734, was unfortunately destroyed by a fire in 1988 following a car accident, taking with it the memory of its charming exterior architecture and the numerous interior historic religious furnishings and works of art. The parishioners were solely dedicated to farming.

The English used this church for a hospital for their sick and wounded in 1759 during the Siege of Quebec.

St. Francois Ile d'Orleans

St. George-de-Cacouna

The seigneury for this area was granted by the King in 1673 but only after the arrival of the Acadians, fleeing deportation in 1758, did the area flourish. The first road ‘King’s Way’ was built in 1798 and the seigneury was sold in 1802 with expansion of population happening rapidly after 1809. The first chapel was built in 1810 and the first resident priest Reverend Joseph Marie Madran arrived in 1813. The church was built between 1845 and 1848 with changes being made in 1852 and 1860. Restoration occurred in 1897.

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St. George Cacouna

St. Henri de Levis

St. Henri began construction in 1869 and the first worship took place in 1879. It is made of wood and stone.

St. Henri de Levis

St. Hilaire

The original church was built in 1798 with the decision to replace it was made in 1830. The church was finished around 1837 and minor additions occurred in 1853 and 1878.

St. Hilaire

St. Ignace Loyola

St. Ignace Loyoly

 

Karen Dumas Genealogy Churches in Quebec
Karen Dumas Genealogy
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